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Doug Frost MS/MW http://dougfrost.com

Bloggerview #9 @ Fermentation

If your not a reader of the excellent wine blog Fermentation you should be. For the past few weeks Tom has been posting interviews with wine bloggers that he feels are important to pay attention to. We feel honored that today our interview went up on his site. Make sure to check it out and let us know what you think.

Thanks Tom for recommending us, and we hope that we can continue to provide good Spanish wine information, oh yeah and that stuff we do about Portugal

too!

Cheers,

Ryan Opaz

  • JohnLopresti

    Congratulations on the coverage at Fermentation blog. I favor two views of that site; the public face <a href="there, ” target=”_blank”>http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/“>there, as well as the tradecraft wine sellers' view <a href="there. ” target=”_blank”>http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/wine_news/index.html“>there. Habiendo pasado bastante tiempo en Espana, y despues ya gozando del saborear los vinos provenientes de aquel pais tan raro, me encuentro satisfecho al encontrar la mencion recientemente que Uds. recibieron en el sitio web TomWark. I am looking forward to learning about the fascinating modern development of terroir sensitive viticulture and enology on Spain's lands some of which claim a <a href="medieval” target=”_blank”>http://www.bodegasiranzo.com/finca_canada_honda/finca_canada_honda.htm“>medievaltitle in some microclimates very suited to grape growing. So far based on my own experimental tasting, it seems Spain's varietal and rootstock decisions are as contentious and proprietary issues as in the north Sonoma countryside where I live in EE UU. However, a few years ago, when Carole Meredith, the famed historical plant material researcher retired from UC Davis to pay fulltime attention to her Napa mountain <a href="vineyard, ” target=”_blank”>http://www.lagiermeredith.com/OurWine.html“>vineyard, a cursory web-based investigation of faculty projects ongoing at UCD revealed one interesting professor's project has had him relocate to Spain for a few years. Reportedly Spain is an exciting new field for winemakers. I wonder if your work and adventures have taken you to the Ecole de Montpelier, over beyond Catalunya, where French ampellography has had some extraordinary practitioners.

  • JohnLopresti

    Congratulations on the coverage at Fermentation blog. I favor two views of that site; the public face <a href="there, ” target=”_blank”>http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/“>there, as well as the tradecraft wine sellers' view <a href="there. ” target=”_blank”>http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/wine_news/index.html“>there. Habiendo pasado bastante tiempo en Espana, y despues ya gozando del saborear los vinos provenientes de aquel pais tan raro, me encuentro satisfecho al encontrar la mencion recientemente que Uds. recibieron en el sitio web TomWark. I am looking forward to learning about the fascinating modern development of terroir sensitive viticulture and enology on Spain's lands some of which claim a <a href="medieval” target=”_blank”>http://www.bodegasiranzo.com/finca_canada_honda/finca_canada_honda.htm“>medievaltitle in some microclimates very suited to grape growing. So far based on my own experimental tasting, it seems Spain's varietal and rootstock decisions are as contentious and proprietary issues as in the north Sonoma countryside where I live in EE UU. However, a few years ago, when Carole Meredith, the famed historical plant material researcher retired from UC Davis to pay fulltime attention to her Napa mountain <a href="vineyard, ” target=”_blank”>http://www.lagiermeredith.com/OurWine.html“>vineyard, a cursory web-based investigation of faculty projects ongoing at UCD revealed one interesting professor's project has had him relocate to Spain for a few years. Reportedly Spain is an exciting new field for winemakers. I wonder if your work and adventures have taken you to the Ecole de Montpelier, over beyond Catalunya, where French ampellography has had some extraordinary practitioners.

  • JohnLopresti

    Congratulations on the coverage at Fermentation blog. I favor two views of that site; the public face <a href="there, ” target=”_blank”>http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/“>there, as well as the tradecraft wine sellers' view <a href="there. ” target=”_blank”>http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/wine_news/index.html“>there. Habiendo pasado bastante tiempo en Espana, y despues ya gozando del saborear los vinos provenientes de aquel pais tan raro, me encuentro satisfecho al encontrar la mencion recientemente que Uds. recibieron en el sitio web TomWark. I am looking forward to learning about the fascinating modern development of terroir sensitive viticulture and enology on Spain's lands some of which claim a <a href="medieval” target=”_blank”>http://www.bodegasiranzo.com/finca_canada_honda/finca_canada_honda.htm“>medievaltitle in some microclimates very suited to grape growing. So far based on my own experimental tasting, it seems Spain's varietal and rootstock decisions are as contentious and proprietary issues as in the north Sonoma countryside where I live in EE UU. However, a few years ago, when Carole Meredith, the famed historical plant material researcher retired from UC Davis to pay fulltime attention to her Napa mountain <a href="vineyard, ” target=”_blank”>http://www.lagiermeredith.com/OurWine.html“>vineyard, a cursory web-based investigation of faculty projects ongoing at UCD revealed one interesting professor's project has had him relocate to Spain for a few years. Reportedly Spain is an exciting new field for winemakers. I wonder if your work and adventures have taken you to the Ecole de Montpelier, over beyond Catalunya, where French ampellography has had some extraordinary practitioners.

  • JohnLopresti

    Congratulations on the coverage at Fermentation blog. I favor two views of that site; the public face there, as well as the tradecraft wine sellers’ view there. Habiendo pasado bastante tiempo en Espana, y despues ya gozando del saborear los vinos provenientes de aquel pais tan raro, me encuentro satisfecho al encontrar la mencion recientemente que Uds. recibieron en el sitio web TomWark. I am looking forward to learning about the fascinating modern development of terroir sensitive viticulture and enology on Spain’s lands some of which claim a medieval title in some microclimates very suited to grape growing. So far based on my own experimental tasting, it seems Spain’s varietal and rootstock decisions are as contentious and proprietary issues as in the north Sonoma countryside where I live in EE UU. However, a few years ago, when Carole Meredith, the famed historical plant material researcher retired from UC Davis to pay fulltime attention to her Napa mountain vineyard, a cursory web-based investigation of faculty projects ongoing at UCD revealed one interesting professor’s project has had him relocate to Spain for a few years. Reportedly Spain is an exciting new field for winemakers. I wonder if your work and adventures have taken you to the Ecole de Montpelier, over beyond Catalunya, where French ampellography has had some extraordinary practitioners.

  • ryan

    Hey there John, thanks for the comment. I have not been to the Ecole de Montpelier, but I will say that Catalunya is full of wineries who are trying to explore more grape varieties. Albet i Noya and Torres, both have a ton of plantings of "lost" varietals. Both are also in the biz of offering help to farmers who want to reinstate vareitals that are not as well known. As far as terroir sensitive agriculture it's rampant here. Micro climates are the new buzzword and people are starting to slowly realize that the word "different" is a good thing. Thanks for joining us at Catavino and we hope to hear from you more!

  • http://catavino.net ryan

    Hey there John, thanks for the comment. I have not been to the Ecole de Montpelier, but I will say that Catalunya is full of wineries who are trying to explore more grape varieties. Albet i Noya and Torres, both have a ton of plantings of “lost” varietals. Both are also in the biz of offering help to farmers who want to reinstate vareitals that are not as well known.
    As far as terroir sensitive agriculture it’s rampant here. Micro climates are the new buzzword and people are starting to slowly realize that the word “different” is a good thing.

    Thanks for joining us at Catavino and we hope to hear from you more!