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How to Enjoy a nice Spanish wine

Pop goes the Cava

How To articles are nice. How to save money. How to drive a car. How to make a million dollars in one week (maybe we should say 2 million at this point). How To articles can help, and can also waste, a fair amount of your time. How to be happy the rest of your life, inherently, is impossible, but we’ll still buy the book only to be left with another dust collector in our office study. So why am I offering a how to? Well, why not? The “How to drive more traffic to your site” reference tool, which told me that “how to” articles are great viral tools, and we all want more traffic, right? So, I’m going to offer a “how to” that you don’t have to buy! It’s totally free! The subject: How to enjoy a Spanish wine! Even if you’ve never tried it, don’t like it, or are indifferent to it, you may find something here that is of use to you. Beyond that, you now have something to share with your friends who will inevitably beg you to, “teach me something about wine“. This way, you can just point them to this article and wash your hands of the responsibility. So without further adieu:

How To Enjoy Spanish Wine

  1. 1) Buy two different bottles of Spanish wine. What kind you ask? Preferably the one you’ve never tried. I say this because if you need to learn how to enjoy Spanish wine, you probably haven’t had one yet that you’ve liked. So pick one out that you’re unfamiliar with, that looks a little different, or simply has a label that peaks your interest. Buy it in a store, take it out of your cellar, or order one in your local restaurant. I suggest two bottles because you’ll never know if you’ll appreciate the first one, so having a second is always a bonus. Plus, I tend to find that the second point can lead to the necessity for an extra bottle. If you find any tasting notes on the label, or points attached to the bottle, please scribble over them with a black magic marker, as they tend to ruin many a wine experience.
  2. 2) Make sure to have a friend, or two, with you. Your sweetheart will do, and could even add to the enjoyment, though you may forget about the wine (not a bad thing) if you and your sweetheart get a little too sweet. Either way, do make sure others are in your close proximity and that you have enough glassware. In the case of you and your sweetheart, you may find you only need/want one glass, as two tends to take away from the fun.
  3. 3) Open bottle(s). Simple, if you know how to use a corkscrew! If not, then watch this useful video.
  4. 4) Pour wine into glass(es). Pour a small amount at first and make sure that you can fully aerate the wine by swirling it in the glass without having it hit your friend across from you. Why you ask? Well, if you really want to know, watch this, though forget the water part. Otherwise, just trust me. We’re here to enjoy the wine, not analyze it!
  5. 5) Ok, here comes the best part. Pick up the glass and taste the wine. If your reaction is “Yuck” please continue to number 6. If your reaction is “Yum”, congrats, because you’re now enjoying a Spanish Wine! Continue drinking staring into your sweetheart’s eyes or while laughing with your friends. If you find that you start to wonder about the wine, quickly take a sip and change the subject.
  6. 6) Ok, so you didn’t like this bottle. DO NOT think that consequently, you do not like Spanish wine. You’ve only tried 1, which is similar to walking off a plane in Spain, and the first person you run into is jumping on one foot with his finger up his nose singing New York, New York, and then declaring that all Spaniards are raving idiots. At this point, pick up the second bottle you bought and go back to step number 3. Repeat often. Ask others what they like, try different things and dare to experiment. Don’t give up.

Let me emphasis that last point: talk with your friends, continue drinking your wine and maybe even nibble on some food. Laugh, debate, question and above all, relax. I find that a good session of grilling can help make a Spanish wine much more enjoyable or even a movie. Sometimes it tastes great after a long day of work, and other times, just because it’s there.

For those of you that thought this was a bit silly, or amateurish, well you obliviously missed my point. Wine is not about the points, the snobbery, or the idea that you need to “understand” it. No, wine is about hanging out, lubricating conversations and reflecting on life. Yes, you can dissect the wine, and analyze it, but that is not a required step on the trail to enjoying wine. First fall in love with the wine, and the rest will come naturally.

I’m thirsty!

Cheers,

Ryan

This article can be easily applied to Portuguese wine or any other wine style you so choose to explore! ;)

  • Lar Veale

    I've had my fair share of Spanish wine and I LOVE it! From Ribera del Duero to Priorat, Somontano, Rias Baixas, Rioja (white and red), it's been all good.

  • Bill

    Coincidentally, I tried a "new" Spanish wine last night that I picked up at Sam's Wine Shop (thanks for the tip, btw). It's called Fidelium from Navarra and it's a blend of Merlot (55%), Cabernet, (30%) Grenache (20%) and Tempranillo (15%). Not a traditional Spanish blend, but an excellent wine for the price. I had the '03 and it's drinking beautifully right now. Very rich with a long tasty finish. Maybe a tad overripe, but at the price and overall quality, I'm not going to complain.

  • http://www.sourgrapes.ie Lar Veale

    I’ve had my fair share of Spanish wine and I LOVE it! From Ribera del Duero to Priorat, Somontano, Rias Baixas, Rioja (white and red), it’s been all good.

  • Bill

    Coincidentally, I tried a “new” Spanish wine last night that I picked up at Sam’s Wine Shop (thanks for the tip, btw). It’s called Fidelium from Navarra and it’s a blend of Merlot (55%), Cabernet, (30%) Grenache (20%) and Tempranillo (15%). Not a traditional Spanish blend, but an excellent wine for the price. I had the ’03 and it’s drinking beautifully right now. Very rich with a long tasty finish. Maybe a tad overripe, but at the price and overall quality, I’m not going to complain.

  • Robert

    Bill – that sounds like a great wine. Any wine that can deliver 120% is OK with me :)

  • Patti

    Great Article, just how I like to enjoy any wine!! You might want to finish the sentence for #6….I think we all know what you were going to say, but it would be nice to finish it!! THis should inspire some newbies to try something new! -Patti

  • http://www.wineconversation.com Robert

    Bill – that sounds like a great wine. Any wine that can deliver 120% is OK with me
    :)

  • Lindsay

    Just made me think of a new "How to" that covers enjoying Spanish wine and remaining functional at the office. A glass of wine would certainly make my Friday afternoon in front a computer a lot more pleasant.

  • Lindsay

    Just made me think of a new “How to” that covers enjoying Spanish wine and remaining functional at the office. A glass of wine would certainly make my Friday afternoon in front a computer a lot more pleasant.