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Rooftop Virtual Tasting – Mencia from the Spanish Wine Region of Bierzo!

Ok so it’s been awhile since our last Rooftop Tasting, but we’re back. I’m still not a fan of editing, so if any of you out there want to help with that send us a note. We’d love to have some help with it. Otherwise, in this episode we taste a couple of wines from Dominio de Tares for our Virtual Tasting of Bierzo! Hope you enjoy it and the Haikus…Big props for comments in Haiku form!

Cheers,

Ryan Opaz

My notes on the wines we tasted.

  • 2004 Dominio de Tares Bierzo Bembibre – Spain, Castilla y León, Bierzo (6/11/2007)
    Very dark adn inky in color. The nose at first is very tight and concentrated with big notes of black pepper and rich earth. Slowly and after much time this begins to turn to dark berries, chocolate, clove, anise and more. In the mouth this is a big wine with hits of spice and tannin that seems to leave my tongue reeling. With time though this gives way to big fruit flavors and after much decanting the tannins reveal a nice acidity behind them with pure cherry and rapberry fruit. Chocolate, oak, and earthiness remain, and while this is a large mouthfull of wine it really develops with enough air into something more elegant that I would have supposed.
    4 grape
  • 2004 Dominio de Tares Bierzo Cepas Viejas – Spain, Castilla y León, Bierzo (6/11/2007)
    Less inky than it’s big brother Bembibre, this wine is a sexy little number that shows rich spice on the nose and pure cherry fruit. Oak is present but not the main focus in this wine. Time softens this wine just enough to make the sultry fruit flow over your tongue and it beigns then to reveal mineral like spices, with hints of clove, cinnamon and spice sparkling through the finish. Great acidity makes this wine a natural for a wide range of foods. Really a fun wine.
    4 grape
  • bbennett

    With my apologies: mencia tongue fruit of black currents swaying hips happy dance windblown hair skirt steak smells complementing decktop tasting erudite wine geek tasting over the rooftops don't burn the steaks glinting in the sunset preparing for battle reidel crystal master rock licker king of the terrace your queen is dancing

  • bbennett

    With my apologies:

    mencia tongue
    fruit of black currents
    swaying hips happy dance

    windblown hair
    skirt steak smells
    complementing decktop tasting

    erudite wine geek
    tasting over the rooftops
    don’t burn the steaks

    glinting in the sunset
    preparing for battle
    reidel crystal

    master rock licker
    king of the terrace
    your queen is dancing

  • Gabriella

    I absolutely love your poem Bill! Colorful, straight-forward and without a doubt the perfect description of your dear friends over the pond. However, if you were shooting for a haiku, I fear that your sense of the 5-7-5 syllable structure of a Haiku may be closer to your distinguished ability to taste river stones ;-) But who is to say Catavino can't have our own version of a Haiku, called a Wineku?

  • http://www.catavino.net Gabriella

    I absolutely love your poem Bill! Colorful, straight-forward and without a doubt the perfect description of your dear friends over the pond. However, if you were shooting for a haiku, I fear that your sense of the 5-7-5 syllable structure of a Haiku may be closer to your distinguished ability to taste river stones ;-) But who is to say Catavino can’t have our own version of a Haiku, called a Wineku?

  • bbennett

    Haiku rules? We don't need no stinking Haiku rules! I love the Wineku idea. You should get it copyrighted if possible. It is actually not a poem, but six haikus. They are untraditional haiku as explained by Jane Reichhold in her "Haiku Techniques" article which I found on the web. Below is a short excerpt of the article, which I read before trying to come up with my haiku: HAIKU TECHNIQUES Jane Reichhold (As published in the Autumn, 2000 issue of Frogpond, Journal of the Haiku Society of America.) In my early years of haiku writing, I easily accepted the prevalent credo being espoused on how to write haiku. This was, sometimes implied and occasionally expressed, as being: if the author's mind/heart was correctly aligned in the "proper" attitude, while experiencing a so-called "haiku moment", one merely had to report on the experience to have a darn-good haiku. One reason for rejoicing in the acceptance of this view, was that it by-passed the old 5-7-5 barrier crisis. This was certainly a plus for the whole 70s haiku scene as there seemed a danger of the entire movement bogging down in fights, arguments and broken friendships. Another advantage of this system of defining a haiku was that it bestowed near-religious honor on the author of a passable haiku. No one knew exactly why a particular haiku was 'good' but it was clear from the ku that the author had experienced a moment of enlightenment (or satori for the Zen inspired). If the moment was holy and the form fit in with the group's philosophy publishing the ku, the haiku was said to be an excellent one. This happened more often if the person judging the ku was a good friend of the haiku's author. ****** I guess I googled the wrong article. But no, Zen teaching would say it's the right article and I agree with that. I promise that I'll work on some traditional haikus for your next rooftop tasting. Until then I'll leave you with this one. animal fat glaze on tasting tongues delightful bierzo chaser BB

  • bbennett

    Haiku rules? We don’t need no stinking Haiku rules!

    I love the Wineku idea. You should get it copyrighted if possible.

    It is actually not a poem, but six haikus. They are untraditional haiku as explained by Jane Reichhold in her “Haiku Techniques” article which I found on the web. Below is a short excerpt of the article, which I read before trying to come up with my haiku:

    HAIKU TECHNIQUES
    Jane Reichhold

    (As published in the Autumn, 2000 issue of Frogpond, Journal of the Haiku Society of America.)

    In my early years of haiku writing, I easily accepted the prevalent credo being espoused on how to write haiku. This was, sometimes implied and occasionally expressed, as being: if the author’s mind/heart was correctly aligned in the “proper” attitude, while experiencing a so-called “haiku moment”, one merely had to report on the experience to have a darn-good haiku.

    One reason for rejoicing in the acceptance of this view, was that it by-passed the old 5-7-5 barrier crisis. This was certainly a plus for the whole 70s haiku scene as there seemed a danger of the entire movement bogging down in fights, arguments and broken friendships.

    Another advantage of this system of defining a haiku was that it bestowed near-religious honor on the author of a passable haiku. No one knew exactly why a particular haiku was ‘good’ but it was clear from the ku that the author had experienced a moment of enlightenment (or satori for the Zen inspired). If the moment was holy and the form fit in with the group’s philosophy publishing the ku, the haiku was said to be an excellent one. This happened more often if the person judging the ku was a good friend of the haiku’s author.

    ******
    I guess I googled the wrong article. But no, Zen teaching would say it’s the right article and I agree with that. I promise that I’ll work on some traditional haikus for your next rooftop tasting.

    Until then I’ll leave you with this one.

    animal fat glaze
    on tasting tongues delightful
    bierzo chaser

    BB

  • Gabriella

    I duel your wiku (better than wineku, no?) with this: Trust not in the tongue Nor the score or the bouquet But only the fun Experience it Sense everything around you Share your memories Wine is not to judge Marketing tipping the scales Let the public choose Feeling a bit political after reading Decanter.

  • http://www.catavino.net Gabriella

    I duel your wiku (better than wineku, no?) with this:

    Trust not in the tongue
    Nor the score or the bouquet
    But only the fun

    Experience it
    Sense everything around you
    Share your memories

    Wine is not to judge
    Marketing tipping the scales
    Let the public choose

    Feeling a bit political after reading Decanter.

  • bbennett

    Very nice and totalling fitting the tenor of your website. Wine is an experience, not a number. Of course, it IS better to experience higher numbered wines, usually. :-) Slowly savoring Surprisingly sweet skirt steak Swimmingly sublime I'm afraid I can't stop. Help.

  • Gabriella

    This is addictive isn't it. I was walking home from the gym as the light was at the perfect angle casting beautiful shadows throughout the park, illuminating the colors of the flowers. It was one of those moments that made you stop in your tracks, breathless. Scorching Spanish day Birds singing, roses blooming I'm so very happy

  • bbennett

    Very nice and totalling fitting the tenor of your website. Wine is an experience, not a number. Of course, it IS better to experience higher numbered wines, usually. :-)

    Slowly savoring
    Surprisingly sweet skirt steak
    Swimmingly sublime

    I’m afraid I can’t stop. Help.

  • http://www.catavino.net Gabriella

    This is addictive isn’t it. I was walking home from the gym as the light was at the perfect angle casting beautiful shadows throughout the park, illuminating the colors of the flowers. It was one of those moments that made you stop in your tracks, breathless.

    Scorching Spanish day
    Birds singing, roses blooming
    I’m so very happy

  • Cornell

    Ok, I don't really understand haiku, wineku or wiku but do appreciate the thoughts and sentiments. I am more basic in my poetic style but so here is an alternative mode of poetic verse extolling what is important when drinking wine: Wine is good No more be said Pull the cork And pour that red Taste seems good But who decides Must be right If you hear the sighs. Where it’s poured With whom it drunk, Means much more Than the numbers junk. But what’s retained Is not the taste But who was there At the tasting place. Good wine can make An event much more But without good friends It’s just a pour.

  • Ryan

    Thanks for the poems…I might need to start a special section for Verse Style Tasting Notes…Ideas, Ideas, Ideas….

  • Cornell

    Ok, I don’t really understand haiku, wineku or wiku but do appreciate the thoughts and sentiments. I am more basic in my poetic style but so here is an alternative mode of poetic verse extolling what is important when drinking wine:

    Wine is good
    No more be said
    Pull the cork
    And pour that red

    Taste seems good
    But who decides
    Must be right
    If you hear the sighs.

    Where it’s poured
    With whom it drunk,
    Means much more
    Than the numbers junk.

    But what’s retained
    Is not the taste
    But who was there
    At the tasting place.

    Good wine can make
    An event much more
    But without good friends
    It’s just a pour.

  • http://www.catavino.net Ryan

    Thanks for the poems…I might need to start a special section for Verse Style Tasting Notes…Ideas, Ideas, Ideas….

  • bbennett

    Great poem, Cornell! Gab, we have wineku, wiku, so, how about viku, the espanol version?

  • bbennett

    Great poem, Cornell!

    Gab, we have wineku, wiku, so, how about viku, the espanol version?

  • el jefe

    I clearly must check in more often… Points are boring but Dancing tasting notes might be Left to Web Three Oh! Nice video! Gabriella is very charming, and even Ryan has his moments :)

  • http://www.elbloggotorcido.com/ el jefe

    I clearly must check in more often…

    Points are boring but
    Dancing tasting notes might be
    Left to Web Three Oh!

    Nice video! Gabriella is very charming, and even Ryan has his moments :)