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The Stupid Things I do for Love

When will I learn?! When will I put my foot down and say, “No honey, I am not a human guinea pig. I will not eat, nor drink something just because the fine people of La Rioja like it. And yes, I do love you, and I do appreciate your fine moral standards to try everything once, but love shouldn’t translate to my eating fried pig ears!” I say this having ingested one big, slimy, hairy and juicy bite of a pig’s ear last Friday night after thoroughly enjoying a round of perfectly sauteed mushrooms! The thought of it still makes my stomach churn in disgust; praying that one day, the image will disappear from my mind.

This isn’t the first time I’ve caved in after seeing Ryan’s eyes light up in fire, furious that I would succumb to my psychological fears. An open mind for me, means that I respect other people’s choices, as long as they don’t hurt themselves or others. Ryan, on the other hand, is fiery and passionate, a major reason why I adore him. No matter how grotesque a beverage or food item might be, he’ll happily take on the challenge, eager to research what others find appealing in the experience. And if those around him crave his respect, they best approach life like they were participating in Survivor, consuming anything that is even remotely edible. He’s not masochistic, requiring you to finish it if you don’t enjoy it, but he does ask that you try everything, once.

And against all logic, I’ll continue to follow his lead! I love his ridiculously high standards that he asks of not only himself, but others. I love his passion for life, his creativity and his desire to suck the marrow out of everything he experiences. Do I want to eat cow’s tongue, pig’s blood or chicken feet? Hell no!! But I’ll continue to do it for him, more out of love than curiosity.

Please tell me that I’m not alone! There must be others of you out there who have consumed things that are either not fit for civilized human beings, or things you previously hated but retried as a result of your partner’s gentle nudge?

Cheers,

Gabriella Opaz

  • Robert

    you ought to be glad he only tried the ears and not all the other 'bits' on offer (if you look) :) erm, glad to say that my other half has a similar world-view to mine and therefore no such peer-pressure applies – we like to try local delicacies but try not to go too far off-beam. We did stray too far once on a trip to Burgundy. Have you tried <a href="andouillettes? ” target=”_blank”>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andouillette“>andouillettes? I quote a small paragraph from the article: "French andouillette, on the other hand, is an acquired taste and can be an interesting challenge even for adventurous eaters who don't object to the taste or aroma of feces." I'm guessing the author didn't enjoy them either! One for Ryan maybe?

  • Gabriella

    Dear God Man, who ends a sentence "for those adventurous eaters who don’t object to the taste or aroma of feces”????

  • Ryan

    I'm in!!!

  • Robert

    he he he! Not only that, but (s)he uses it several times. I must point out that the term "faeces" or anything related, was not found on the dishes description on the menu when we ordered it. Although I managed to eat most of mine, I can reflect back on the occasion and recall the sort of aromas they refer to. Don't worry Gabriella, with time the memory fades. This was only 6 years ago for me!

  • Taster B

    Here's one:<a href="<a href="http://parosparadise.blogspot.comhttp://parosparadise.blogspot.com<br />”><a href="http://parosparadise.blogspot.comhttp://parosparadise.blogspot.com<br /> It's not a wine blog but he does posts on food and drink… As for the orejas for love: I guess we just don't love each other that much. ;) Becky

  • Erika

    I take it from the opposite view actually as I am an incredibly adventurous eater, who pressures others (kinda like Ryan). "If you don't try this, you are severely missing out!! You must!!" — usually my mantra. But now I am dating someone who is not only very strictly kosher but a picky eater. So I'm learning to not chastise him when he orders his avocado cucumber rolls and adapting to eating in a lot of kosher jaunts. I can save my meals of tripe and foie gras for girlfriends or family, if it means I can share a meal with him.

  • http://wineculture.blogspot.com Robert

    you ought to be glad he only tried the ears and not all the other ‘bits’ on offer (if you look)
    :)

    erm, glad to say that my other half has a similar world-view to mine and therefore no such peer-pressure applies – we like to try local delicacies but try not to go too far off-beam. We did stray too far once on a trip to Burgundy. Have you tried andouillettes? I quote a small paragraph from the article:

    “French andouillette, on the other hand, is an acquired taste and can be an interesting challenge even for adventurous eaters who don’t object to the taste or aroma of feces.”

    I’m guessing the author didn’t enjoy them either!

    One for Ryan maybe?

  • http://www.catavino.net Gabriella

    Dear God Man, who ends a sentence “for those adventurous eaters who don’t object to the taste or aroma of feces”????

  • http://www.obiscoito.com Ryan

    I’m in!!!

  • http://wineculture.blogspot.com Robert

    he he he!

    Not only that, but (s)he uses it several times.

    I must point out that the term “faeces” or anything related, was not found on the dishes description on the menu when we ordered it. Although I managed to eat most of mine, I can reflect back on the occasion and recall the sort of aromas they refer to.

    Don’t worry Gabriella, with time the memory fades. This was only 6 years ago for me!

  • http://smellslikegrape.blogspot.com Taster B

    Here’s one:
    http://parosparadise.blogspot.com

    It’s not a wine blog but he does posts on food and drink…

    As for the orejas for love: I guess we just don’t love each other that much. ;)

    Becky

  • http://www.StrumErika.com Erika

    I take it from the opposite view actually as I am an incredibly adventurous eater, who pressures others (kinda like Ryan). “If you don’t try this, you are severely missing out!! You must!!” — usually my mantra. But now I am dating someone who is not only very strictly kosher but a picky eater. So I’m learning to not chastise him when he orders his avocado cucumber rolls and adapting to eating in a lot of kosher jaunts. I can save my meals of tripe and foie gras for girlfriends or family, if it means I can share a meal with him.

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  • http://www.passionatefoodie.blogspot.com RichardA

    I am generally fairly adventurous when it comes to eating. I will try most anything, though there are exceptions. When I was in Spain this past fall, I ate some things I had not had before, including a pig’s tail. I loved the Morcilla. I did draw the line though at the lamb testicle. My wife did try it and encouraged me to do the same, but despite my love for her, I just couldn’t do it.

  • http://www.oenophilia.wordpress.com Oenophilus

    O.K. , gang. While most of these foods fall under the list of cultural hangover remedies, I still have an empty stomach here in the California time zone! I guess I fall between Gabi and Ryan; I’ll try almost anything, but have learned to resist saying, “Oh. That’s good…very interesting…Yes, Si, Oui, Ja. I’ll have some more ” out of mere cultural sensitivity while my innards churn. My darling wife is as polite as they come, but has nowhere near the undying devotion to my adventurous spirit that the Familia Opaz shares.

  • http://www.innhousepublishing.com Charles M

    When I order ‘andouillette’ in a restaurant, my other half Kathryn disowns me and sits at a table as far away as possible. Yes, andouillete does have a whiff of something dangerous, but is exciting and challenging (and brilliant with Premier Cru Chablis). The world divides into those who adore durian and those who reject it, with its coffee-creamy flavour and faint odour of rotting meat. No prizes for guessing that I’m among the former, and Kathryn the latter.

    What I object to about pig’s ears is their blandness. The Portuguese use them for texture. Er, sort of crunchy, since you ask. And I was once led into a tapas bar in Haro, Rioja, with the promise of an unusual speciality. A plate arrived, with three battered and deep-fried, um, objects. You’ve guessed it, ears. Pig, lamb and calf. To me, a pointless exercise in fat ingestion. I want my food to have flavour, even if it’s a slightly dangerous one…

  • shawty

    hey yes that is true what you got to do you got to do so that person no how much you love them …..